Why is radiometric dating important

26 Mar

Scientific knowledge of Earth’s geologic history has advanced significantly since the development of radiometric dating, a method of age determination based on the principle that radioactive atoms in geologic materials decay at constant, known rates to daughter atoms.

Others like fossilized wood have had the organic material completely replaced by minerals.The igneous activity that produced such intrusions......calculation was based on the assumption that the substance of the Earth is inert and thus incapable of producing new heat.Nevertheless, there is substantial evidence that the Earth and the other bodies of the Solar System are 4.5-4.6 billion years old, and that the Milky Way Galaxy and the Universe are older still.The principal evidence for the antiquity of Earth and its cosmic surroundings is: Spontaneous breakdown or decay of atomic nuclei, termed radioactive decay, is the basis for all radiometric dating methods.Carbon-14 is a method used for young (less than 50,000 year old) sedimentary rocks.This method relies on the uptake of a naturally occurring radioactive isotope of carbon, carbon-14 by all living things.His estimate came into question after the discovery of naturally occurring radioactivity by the French physicist Henri Becquerel in 1896 and the subsequent recognition by his colleagues, Marie and Pierre Curie, that compounds of radium (which occur in uranium minerals)...Another role of isotopic geochemistry that is of great importance in geology is radiometric age dating. Beginning with studies in the 1950s, a much better chronology and record of Pleistocene climatic events have evolved through analyses of deep-sea sediments, particularly from the oxygen isotope record of the shells of microorganisms that lived in the oceans. Its crust is continually being created, modified, and destroyed.As a result, rocks that record its earliest history have not been found and probably no longer exist.