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We wish to acknowledge the land upon which we gather today.These lands carry the memories and stories of resistance of these people, includ- ing their struggles for survival and identity in the face of overwhelming colonizing power.This is a career which is rife with disappointments and rejections, and you sort of have to come to terms with that early on if you're going to survive emotionally."), r = n i; try catch (d) } }, r(function() ); var reg = new Reg Exp("MSIE ([0-9] [\.0-9]*)"); reg.exec(Agent) ?He placed the ad in the newspaper in an effort to understand why it happened and learn his fiancée's reasons for killing herself through the stories of women in similar situations.

A few of these documents are by unknown writers, although traditional historiography has given them names.

They are of different blood, and are the family of Nortons referred to in Strype's up in the family of Sir Thomas More—and by her he had several sons.1 He was still living, though extremely ill when he lost his second wife in the year 1581: and died at Sharpenhoe, 10th March, 1582-3,2 having witnessed nearly all his sons' career. 1741-2 This ancestor of the second branch of the family was one of the leading citizens of the Vineyard and its first representative to the General Court of Mass. He was sheriff of the county in 1699 and was commissioned as Justice of the Court of Common Pleas in 1702.

He held for^ life, with remainder to his son Thomas, the advowson and right of presentation to Streatley, together with the rectorial tithes of Streatley and Sharpenhoe,3 as well as the manor and mansion of Sharpenhoe, and other land there. He resided at Major's Cove near Miober's Bridge where he lived until his death, 30 Jan.

There is no trace of the school in which Norton was taught the rudiments of the Latin tongue, of which, at an early period of his life (although he had not then proceeded to either University), he was a complete master; but he very soon obtained the substantial patronage of the Protector Somerset : and was in such favour, that he is thought by Herbert* " to have been the state amanuensis." When only eighteen years of age his first work appeared : it was printed in October, 1550,5 and was a very well executed translation of Peter Martyr's letter to Somerset,6 rendered into English at the desire of Norton's patron.

Somerset did not long live to patronize and assist; and Norton, turning his attention to the law as a profession, entered himself, in 1555, as a student of the Inner Temple.7 His success in his profession shows that he must have studied the law diligently; and yet, during the very period of his keeping his terms, he found time for those literary labours, which have commended him to us.